Two Nurses Share Their Top Tips for Diapers

Hi, this is Jamie and Emily from Nurture by NAPS. We are Labor & Delivery nurses and lactation consultants, as well as business owners and moms. We are passionate about getting new and expecting parents the info they need to be successful with newborns. Got more questions for us? Find out more at the end of this post.

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Let’s face it, prepping for a baby can be overwhelming. Out of the 5,000 diaper brands out there who is really the most absorbent? Is diaper rash really inevitable? Does your baby really fit into size 1 diapers? From the hospital to our virtual zoom calls, in all of the time we’ve spent caring for nervous mothers we get asked 101 questions. So we’ve come up with a quick diaper guide to help ease your top concerns.  

What should I look for in a diaper? 

Checking out brands and features is key. Make sure you pick a diaper that has good absorbency. It should be soft and breathable.  Many diapers have a line down the front that turns color when it gets wet, to help you know when to change the diaper.  Consider your baby’s skin sensitivity when looking at the brands that are available.  Every kid has different skin and will tolerate diapers differently.  For example, babies with sensitive skin may need something organic, super soft and extra breathable.  And finally consider the price. What can you get in bulk that is affordable as you go through a lot of diapers in a day? Newborns use anywhere from 8-12 diapers per day(!) so picking a diaper brand that falls within your budget is key. 

How to know when you need to change sizes?

Oftentimes, you notice accidents suddenly around the time you have to size up.  For example, you find a baby with a wet onesie, and pee has leaked through or up the belly or back, or you’re getting some poop explosions up the back.  Sudden accidents like this are usually a good indicator the diaper size needs to go up.  Or, is the diaper just feeling a little snug? Having a hard time getting those diaper straps to cross over and stick?  Feeling a little tight on those chubby baby thighs? Give them more breathing room by going up a size. It’s totally normal for babies to be outside the weight range recommended on a diaper package - go with what works for you and your little one.

Will a quick change ever be in my future?

Newborns don’t love having their diapers changed because they are very exposed and prefer to be held and snuggly.  Some babies don’t mind a diaper change as they get older, while others cry, or roll around or are trying to be on the go during the diaper change. Pro tip: for a quick change, have everything ready. Changing mat, wipes already dispensed and ready to use, diaper paste ready with the lid off.  Put your clean diaper UNDER the soiled diaper the baby is wearing, so when you take that down and wipe them and remove it, the clean diaper is already fanned out under them and ready to be pulled up. This makes the whole process faster and much easier. 

Are leaks and blow outs common?

Sometimes we get leaks or blowouts, and it’s not because the diaper is the wrong size.  Great examples are the kid that pees a lot overnight, so they leak through their diaper while sleeping overnight, or blowouts on a car ride, because they are perfectly positioned in their car seat to relax, and poop goes right up their back!  Tips: If you have a kid that pees through their overnight diaper, or can’t make it until morning in the overnight diaper, put on 2 diapers overnight.  One goes on the regular way, with the straps in the front, then apply the second diaper over it, backwards, so the straps fasten in the back for extra protection to keep your little one dry.  Constant car ride blowouts when in the car seat, causing you headaches?  Put a waterproof reusable diaper or swim suit bottom over the diaper for an extra seal to contain the mess. 

Is diaper rash really inevitable?

Don’t wait until your baby has redness or a rash to treat it.  Proactively apply Aquaphor or bum paste with each diaper change.  Newborn babies are constantly peeing and pooping, and sitting in wetness can lead to skin irritation and breakdown.  Putting a barrier cream or paste on them with each diaper change gives them a layer of protection to keep the skin from breaking down.  Before applying bum paste, make sure the skin is dry! Baby wipes are very moist and after wiping, if you apply bum paste immediately, you might be sealing moisture into the skin.  Let the bum air dry, or blow it dry (just blow with your mouth - no need for a hair dryer) and then apply your bum paste.  We love anything thick and white - like Triple Paste. Pay attention too to the ingredients in your diapers and wipes. Contact dermatitis is a type of rash that can result from contact with chemical agents, like ones found in many skin care products and color dyes, so you’ll want to look for products that don’t contain common irritants.

 

Raising a baby is tricky and the task seems to bring with it never-ending questions. Our number one tip for moms is to build a strong support system. Surround yourself with those who love and support you and build a team of experts for those hard to answer questions that tend inevitably come up. Got more questions for us? Check us out over at www.NurturebyNAPS.com and give us a follow on Instagram @NurtureByNaps. Through our online membership, you can ask a Registered Nurse a question any time and get a response within 24 hours! 

 

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About the author

Hi, this is Jamie and Emily from Nurture by NAPS. We are Labor & Delivery nurses and lactation consultants, as well as business owners and moms. We are passionate about getting new and expecting parents the info they need to be successful with newborns. Got more questions for us? Check us out over at www.NurturebyNAPS.com and give us a follow on Instagram @NurturebyNAPS.

Question? Email us at hello@mykudos.com

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